Deploy Supervisor on AWS and MacOS

Introduction

Here are what this article is going to cover:

  1. Deploy Supervisor on MacOS
  2. Deploy Supervisor on AWS

What is Supervisor?

Supervisor is a process monitor and control system. Because Ray do use Laravel Queue on a project, and queue worker has to be running on the background continuously. So what if the queue work fails and disconnect? With Supervisor, we will be able to restart them after they either fail or close.

Mac OS

Install

  • Install Supervisor
    brew install supervisor

Deployment

  • Enter the default configuration file

    sudo vim /usr/local/etc/supervisord.ini
  • Change the default include directory at the end as follows:

    [include]
    files = /usr/local/etc/supervisor.d/*.conf
  • Add a customized directory and configuration file

    mkdir /usr/local/etc/supervisor.d;
    vim /usr/local/etc/supervisor.d/processNameYouLike.conf;
  • Give the setting below

    [program:programNameYouLike]
    process_name=%(program_name)s_%(process_num)02d
    command=php absoluteAddressOfYourProject/artisan queue:work sqs --sleep=3 --tries=3 --daemon
    autostart=true
    autorestart=true
    user=ray
    numprocs=8
    redirect_stderr=true
    stdout_logfile=/absoluteAddressOfLocationYouWouldLikeToPutTheLog/worker.log

Launch

  • Launch the service

    sudo supervisord -c /usr/local/etc/supervisord.ini
  • Go into service control

    sudo supervisorctl -c /usr/local/etc/supervisord.ini
  • Update the configuration

    update
  • Check the status

    status

It should look like that

AWS

Here is the specification of the instance we use

  • Amazon Linux 2 AMI (HVM), SSD Volume Type - ami-0f9ae750e8274075b
  • t2.micro (Variable ECUs, 1 vCPUs, 2.5 GHz, Intel Xeon Family, 1 GiB memory, EBS only)

Install

  • Install Supervisor
    sudo yum install -y supervisor

Configuration

  • Go to the default configuration file

    sudo vim /etc/supervisord.conf
  • Change the include directory at the end

    [include]
    files = supervisord.d/*.conf
  • Add a new configuration file. If the directory doesn’t exist, then make one.

    sudo mkdir /etc/supervisord.d;
    sudo vim /etc/supervisord.d/projectFileNameYouLike.conf
  • Give the setting.

    [program:laravel-worker]
    process_name=%(program_name)s_%(process_num)02d
    command=sudo php absoluteAddressOfYourProject/artisan queue:work sqs --sleep=3 --tries=3 --daemon
    autostart=true
    autorestart=true
    user=root
    numprocs=8
    redirect_stderr=true
    stdout_logfile=absoluteAddressOfYourProject/worker.log

Launch

  • Launch Supervisor

    sudo supervisord -c /etc/supervisord.conf
  • Apply new setting and check the status

    sudo supervisorctl update;
    sudo supervisorctl status

Automatic start after system reboot

  • Add a new configuration of restart Supervisor

    sudo vim /etc/init.d/supervisord
  • Give the setting as follows:

    #! /bin/sh
    ### BEGIN INIT INFO
    # Provides: supervisord
    # Required-Start: $remote_fs
    # Required-Stop: $remote_fs
    # Default-Start: 2 3 4 5
    # Default-Stop: 0 1 6
    # Short-Description: Example initscript
    # Description: This file should be used to construct scripts to be
    # placed in /etc/init.d.
    ### END INIT INFO

    # Author: Dan MacKinlay <danielm@phm.gov.au>
    # Based on instructions by Bertrand Mathieu
    # http://zebert.blogspot.com/2009/05/installing-django-solr-varnish-and.html

    # Do NOT "set -e"

    # PATH should only include /usr/* if it runs after the mountnfs.sh script
    PATH=/sbin:/usr/sbin:/bin:/usr/bin
    DESC="Description of the service"
    NAME=supervisord
    DAEMON=/usr/local/bin/supervisord
    DAEMON_ARGS=""
    PIDFILE=/var/run/$NAME.pid
    SCRIPTNAME=/etc/init.d/$NAME

    # Exit if the package is not installed
    [ -x "$DAEMON" ] || exit 0

    # Read configuration variable file if it is present
    [ -r /etc/default/$NAME ] && . /etc/default/$NAME

    # Load the VERBOSE setting and other rcS variables
    . /lib/init/vars.sh

    # Define LSB log_* functions.
    # Depend on lsb-base (>= 3.0-6) to ensure that this file is present.
    . /lib/lsb/init-functions

    #
    # Function that starts the daemon/service
    #
    do_start()
    {
    # Return
    # 0 if daemon has been started
    # 1 if daemon was already running
    # 2 if daemon could not be started
    start-stop-daemon --start --quiet --pidfile $PIDFILE --exec $DAEMON --test > /dev/null \
    || return 1
    start-stop-daemon --start --quiet --pidfile $PIDFILE --exec $DAEMON -- \
    $DAEMON_ARGS \
    || return 2
    # Add code here, if necessary, that waits for the process to be ready
    # to handle requests from services started subsequently which depend
    # on this one. As a last resort, sleep for some time.
    }

    #
    # Function that stops the daemon/service
    #
    do_stop()
    {
    # Return
    # 0 if daemon has been stopped
    # 1 if daemon was already stopped
    # 2 if daemon could not be stopped
    # other if a failure occurred
    start-stop-daemon --stop --quiet --retry=TERM/30/KILL/5 --pidfile $PIDFILE --name $NAME
    RETVAL="$?"
    [ "$RETVAL" = 2 ] && return 2
    # Wait for children to finish too if this is a daemon that forks
    # and if the daemon is only ever run from this initscript.
    # If the above conditions are not satisfied then add some other code
    # that waits for the process to drop all resources that could be
    # needed by services started subsequently. A last resort is to
    # sleep for some time.
    start-stop-daemon --stop --quiet --oknodo --retry=0/30/KILL/5 --exec $DAEMON
    [ "$?" = 2 ] && return 2
    # Many daemons don't delete their pidfiles when they exit.
    rm -f $PIDFILE
    return "$RETVAL"
    }

    #
    # Function that sends a SIGHUP to the daemon/service
    #
    do_reload() {
    #
    # If the daemon can reload its configuration without
    # restarting (for example, when it is sent a SIGHUP),
    # then implement that here.
    #
    start-stop-daemon --stop --signal 1 --quiet --pidfile $PIDFILE --name $NAME
    return 0
    }

    case "$1" in
    start)
    [ "$VERBOSE" != no ] && log_daemon_msg "Starting $DESC" "$NAME"
    do_start
    case "$?" in
    0|1) [ "$VERBOSE" != no ] && log_end_msg 0 ;;
    2) [ "$VERBOSE" != no ] && log_end_msg 1 ;;
    esac
    ;;
    stop)
    [ "$VERBOSE" != no ] && log_daemon_msg "Stopping $DESC" "$NAME"
    do_stop
    case "$?" in
    0|1) [ "$VERBOSE" != no ] && log_end_msg 0 ;;
    2) [ "$VERBOSE" != no ] && log_end_msg 1 ;;
    esac
    ;;
    #reload|force-reload)
    #
    # If do_reload() is not implemented then leave this commented out
    # and leave 'force-reload' as an alias for 'restart'.
    #
    #log_daemon_msg "Reloading $DESC" "$NAME"
    #do_reload
    #log_end_msg $?
    #;;
    restart|force-reload)
    #
    # If the "reload" option is implemented then remove the
    # 'force-reload' alias
    #
    log_daemon_msg "Restarting $DESC" "$NAME"
    do_stop
    case "$?" in
    0|1)
    do_start
    case "$?" in
    0) log_end_msg 0 ;;
    1) log_end_msg 1 ;; # Old process is still running
    *) log_end_msg 1 ;; # Failed to start
    esac
    ;;
    *)
    # Failed to stop
    log_end_msg 1
    ;;
    esac
    ;;
    *)
    #echo "Usage: $SCRIPTNAME {start|stop|restart|reload|force-reload}" >&2
    echo "Usage: $SCRIPTNAME {start|stop|restart|force-reload}" >&2
    exit 3
    ;;
    esac

    :

script source

  • Add execute authority

    sudo chmod +x /etc/init.d/supervisord
  • Add the configuration into system

    sudo chkconfig --add supervisord
  • Switch on the configuration and start

    sudo chkconfig supervisord on
    sudo service supervisord start

Conclusion

After the configuration, whenever AWS is rebooted, Supervisor will automatically restart

Implement Laravel Queue with AWS SQS A flexible git flow

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